RETURN OF THE BLACK MADONNA

“Every archetype has its seasons. They come and go according to the deepest, often unconscious, needs of the psyche both personal and collective. Today the Black Madonna is returning.”

Matthew Fox, Return of the Black Madonna, ©2006

The Black Madonna

Karen at The Lonely Post-Modern Artsy-Fartsy Peep Show

Karen Bernard by George A. Hanson

The images in this posting are George A. Hanson’s photographs of Karen Bernard’s Removed Exposure performance at the Post-Modern Artsy Fartsy Peep Show performance at Tribeca Cinema in Manhattan.  The quotes are from Matthew Fox’s The Return of the Black Madonna.

The Black Madonna

“She is coming, not going, and she is calling us to something new (and very ancient as well). The last time the Black Madonna played a major role in western culture and psyche was the twelfth century renaissance, a renaissance that the great historian M.D. Chenu said was the “only renaissance that worked in the West.”

Karen at The Lonely Post-Modern Artsy-Fartsy Peep Show

Karen Bernard by George A. Hanson

“It worked because it was grass roots. And from this renaissance was birthed the University, the Cathedral, the city itself. She brought with her a resacralization of culture and a vision that awakened the young. In short, it was the last time the goddess entered western culture in a major way.”

Karen at The Lonely Post-Modern Artsy-Fartsy Peep Show

Karen Bernard by George A. Hanson


“The Black Madonna is Dark and calls us to the darkness.. Darkness is something we need to get used to again—the “Enlightenment” has deceived us into being afraid of the dark and distant from it. Light switches are illusory. They feed the notion that we can “master nature” (Descartes’ false promise) and overcome all darkness with a flick of our finger.”

Karen at The Lonely Post-Modern Artsy-Fartsy Peep Show

Meister Eckhart observes that “the ground of the soul is dark.”[3] Thus to avoid the darkness is to live superficially, cut off from one’s ground, one’s depth. The Black Madonna invites us into the dark and therefore into our depths. This is what the mystics call the “inside” of things, the essence of things. This is where Divinity lies. It is where the true self lies. It is where illusions are broken apart and the truth lies. Andrew Harvey puts it this way: “The Black Madonna is the transcendent Kali-Mother, the black womb of light out of which all of the worlds are always arising and into which they fall, the presence behind all things, the darkness of love and the loving unknowing into which the child of the Mother goes when his or her illumination is perfect.” She calls us to that darkness which is mystery itself. She encourages us to be at home there, in the presence of deep, black, unsolveable mystery. She is, in Harvey’s words, “the blackness of divine mystery, that mystery celebrated by the great Aphophatic mystics, such as Dionysisus Areopagite, who see the divine as forever unknowable, mysterious, beyond all our concepts, hidden from all our senses in a light so dazzling it registers on them as darkness.”

Eckhart calls God’s darkness a “superessential darkness, a mystery behind mystery, a mystery within mystery that no light has penetrated.”  To honor darkness is to honor the experience of people of color. Its opposite is racism. The Black Madonna invites us to get over racial stereotypes and racial fears and projections and to go for the dark.

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One Response to “RETURN OF THE BLACK MADONNA”

  1. RETURN OF THE BLACK MADONNA | newdancealliance.org Says:

    […] RETURN OF THE BLACK MADONNA […]

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